It's a sport, business and sometimes even religion
yankees:

Alfonso Soriano homers in style.

Golf it!

yankees:

Alfonso Soriano homers in style.

Golf it!

diamondvisiondude:

Whatcha got on that Chicken? 

What a show off

diamondvisiondude:

Whatcha got on that Chicken? 

What a show off

diamondvisiondude:

Adam Wainwright has more hits in the game than he has allowed. 

I respect pitchers who can hit

diamondvisiondude:

Adam Wainwright has more hits in the game than he has allowed. 

I respect pitchers who can hit

yankees:

The Solarte-Roberts-Sizemore triple play.

If I was a Devil Rays fan I wouldve been so sad

yankees:

The Solarte-Roberts-Sizemore triple play.

If I was a Devil Rays fan I wouldve been so sad

throwtheknuckleball:

A.J. Pierzynski catches the hit-by-pitch.

Just a bit inside

throwtheknuckleball:

A.J. Pierzynski catches the hit-by-pitch.

Just a bit inside

nosebleedhooligans:

diamondvisiondude:

   It looks like Mike Napoli broke his left right finger stealing second base last night. Sliding head first has its dangers and Napoli found that out the hard way. 

The third photo is gross. 

That must have stung a little

Can I get this without a players name?
There’s an Adrian Gonzalez one but it doesn’t have the “deme beisbol o deme muerte” Which is what I liked the most.

Can I get this without a players name?

There’s an Adrian Gonzalez one but it doesn’t have the “deme beisbol o deme muerte” Which is what I liked the most.

The The Angels Angels of Anaheim

The The Angels Angels of Anaheim


One of the myths of the game is that Robinson was chosen by Rickey because of his forbearance, his ability to absorb slurs without hitting back.
To anyone who knew him, the notion of Jackie Robinson turning the other cheek, putting up with insults, was laughable. I have never been able to find one veteran chronicler of the early Robinson days who remembers Jackie being anything but truculent and unbending in the face of slurs and insults.
Jackie made sure you treated him as a man. He didn’t suffer fools gladly. … He was as deeply suspicious of the flatterers as he was the bigots.
 Jackie wore no man’s collar. Ever. Long before Rosa Parks, he had refused to move to the back of the bus—in the Army. He was court-martialed. He was acquitted.
I remember once, in a kind of confidential exchange I had with him, I was brash enough to suggest incautiously, “But, Jackie, on the whole, wasn’t there less bigotry and intolerance out there than you expected?”
Jackie fixed me with a glare.
"There shouldn’t have been any,” he said sternly.
You never argued with Jackie Robinson. He made America live up to its promises. [x]

One of the myths of the game is that Robinson was chosen by Rickey because of his forbearance, his ability to absorb slurs without hitting back.

To anyone who knew him, the notion of Jackie Robinson turning the other cheek, putting up with insults, was laughable. I have never been able to find one veteran chronicler of the early Robinson days who remembers Jackie being anything but truculent and unbending in the face of slurs and insults.

Jackie made sure you treated him as a man. He didn’t suffer fools gladly. … He was as deeply suspicious of the flatterers as he was the bigots.

Jackie wore no man’s collar. Ever. Long before Rosa Parks, he had refused to move to the back of the bus—in the Army. He was court-martialed. He was acquitted.

I remember once, in a kind of confidential exchange I had with him, I was brash enough to suggest incautiously, “But, Jackie, on the whole, wasn’t there less bigotry and intolerance out there than you expected?”

Jackie fixed me with a glare.

"There shouldn’t have been any,” he said sternly.

You never argued with Jackie Robinson. He made America live up to its promises. [x]

this-day-in-baseball:

April 15, 1959 Cardinals right-hander Bob Gibson makes his major league debut at LA Memorial Coliseum tossing the final two innings in the 5-0 loss to the Dodgers. The 23-year old rookie becomes the first future Hall of Fame pitcher to give up a home run to the first batter he faces in the major leagues when third baseman Jim Baxes takes him deep in the seventh inning.

Well that’s one way to start a career

this-day-in-baseball:

April 15, 1959
Cardinals right-hander Bob Gibson makes his major league debut at LA Memorial Coliseum tossing the final two innings in the 5-0 loss to the Dodgers. The 23-year old rookie becomes the first future Hall of Fame pitcher to give up a home run to the first batter he faces in the major leagues when third baseman Jim Baxes takes him deep in the seventh inning.

Well that’s one way to start a career